New FREE CDC Continuing Education: Zika-Associated Birth Defects and Neurodevelopmental Abnormalities Possibly Associated With Congenital Zika Virus Infection

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CDC’s MMWR and Medscape introduce a new FREE continuing education (CE) activity. Clinicians will become aware of the frequency and type of birth defects and neurodevelopmental abnormalities seen among children born to mothers with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection.

This activity is intended for obstetricians/ gynecologists, infectious disease clinicians, neurologists, nurses, pediatricians, psychiatrists, public health officials, and other clinicians caring for children born to mothers exposed to Zika virus during pregnancy.

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to

  1. Describe the frequency of Zika-associated birth defects and/or neurodevelopmental abnormalities possibly associated with congenital Zika virus infection in infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection reported to the US Zika Pregnancy and Infant Registry (USZPIR)
  2. Explain clinical and public health implications of these findings from USZPIR regarding Zika-associated birth defects and/or neurodevelopmental abnormalities in infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection
  3. Determine potential limitations of these findings from USZPIR regarding Zika-associated birth defects and/or neurodevelopmental abnormalities in infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection

To access this FREE MMWR / Medscape CE activity visit https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/901873. If you are not a registered user on Medscape, you may register for free or login without a password and get unlimited access to all continuing education activities and other Medscape features.

 

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